BUDGET POLICY REPORTS

Aid to Locals Report: 2017 Update
The damage from the Great Recession, which began nearly a decade ago, was compounded by Governor Sam Brownback’s 2012 tax plan. While the rest of the country and surrounding states have recovered, cities and counties across Kansas struggle to rebuild post-recession and continue to bear the impact of disinvestment in the programs and services that are key to the state’s high quality of life.


Kansas Can’t Afford Securitization: Selling Off Children’s Initiatives Fund Proceeds Makes the State’s Already Shaky Finances Worse
Selling of revenues from the Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) to address a self-inficted budget crisis is an irresponsible proposal that carries devastating consequences if enacted. This move, known as ‘securitization,’ would further endanger Kansas’ already unstable fscal standing by making yetanother credit rating downgrade likely and possibly putting the state at risk of billions in toxic debt.


The Future of Kansas is Running on Fumes
Robbing the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) Highway Fund to pay for Kansas’ unaffordable tax cuts – including the governor’s proposal to transfer nearly $1.2 billion in the current and next two budget years – is taking a toll on the health of our highways and still fails to address Kansas’ ongoing revenue problem.


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Who Pays? The Cost of Kansas’ Tax Cuts for Local Communities
Kansas has sharply reduced state support for schools, libraries and other community services in recent years, forcing towns and cities to cut programs that Kansans depend upon or raise more money locally to sustain them. While the cuts by the state were initially prompted by the Great Recession, the substantial income tax cuts Kansas lawmakers enacted in 2012 and 2013 are draining even more resources and making it nearly impossible to replace vital aid to Kansas communities.


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Kansas’ Self-Made Fiscal Cliff
At a time when Kansas could be digging itself out of the hole created by the Great Recession, the state is instead on a path to more economic pain and uncertainty because of unaffordable tax cuts and spending cuts that are eroding the foundations of prosperity. Kansas lawmakers have the opportunity to reverse this course in the upcoming legislative session. They can get back to making investments in schools, transportation, health care and other building blocks of a strong workforce and a sound economy.


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